MRI

The MRI has a repertoire of noises that resemble, in no particular order: a game-show buzzer for a wrong answer, urgent knocking, a modem from 1992, a grizzly-bear growl, and a man with a raspy voice shouting what sounds like "mother cooler ― AJ Jacobs

MRI

image by: Lee Health
     

"I’m usually pretty calm about medical testing, unless of course I have to EAT or DRINK contrast – because that is an entirely different beast on its own – but I had heard so many horror stories about MRI’s over the years and I was actually a little nervous.

Although I don’t consider myself to be claustrophobic, per say, I do have a REALLY hard time sitting still. And it’s REALLY important to stay still when the machine is taking images and they usually take a lot longer than other radiological tests, like a CT scan or a simple X-ray. I was so stressed I wouldn’t be able to make it through the whole thing without messing up the exam. Given, I do have ADHD but that wasn’t necessarily driving my fear, although it does presents its own problems with not being able to move at all.

Mainly, it’s my usual course of symptoms that make lying still almost impossible at times. My joints lock up when I stay in one position for too long and when I am nauseated, forget it – there’s no way I can stay calm and immobile. If I don’t move around or am FORCED to lay down when I feel like I’m going to vomit, I panic. So, of course, I am extremely anxious as I’m changing into my sexy hospital gown and getting ready for the test,..

I take off all my jewelry. My hair clips. My headband. I’m paranoid that I forgot some metal in my body. I really really really don’t want it torn violently out my body by this giant, magnetic machine. Just when I think I am good, I remember one more piercing. Damn, that was close.  I wonder if the gadolinium cause a reaction similar to the iodine (in CT Scans)? Please don’t let me get violently sick…I really hate the unknown…But I either do the test or live with the unknown forever...

You’ll be asked to fill out a screening form... The form may ask whether you’ve had any previous surgeries. It also may ask whether you have any metal objects or medical devices (like a cardiac pacemaker) in your body.

Some implanted medical devices, such as man-made heart valves and coronary stents, are safe around the MRI machine, but others are not. For example, the MRI machine can:

  • Cause implanted cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators to malfunction.
  • Damage cochlear (inner-ear) implants. Cochlear implants are small, electronic devices that help people who are deaf or who can’t hear well understand speech and the sounds around them.
  • Cause brain aneurysm (AN-u-rism) clips to move as a result of the MRI’s strong magnetic field. This can cause severe injury.

Talk to your doctor or the MRI technician if you have concerns about any implanted devices that may interfere with the MRI...

In all truth, it was one of the easiest tests I’ve had done, despite the length of time and immobility. Way better than barium swallows or having to eat disgusting, bland food with nuclear isotopes in it, that’s for sure.

Maybe it was that I was super tired from the drive or from being woke up the night before, I dunno, but I didn’t even feel the need to move at all. Plus, I got headphones to listen to the radio station of my choice… Indie Rock it is. I closed my eyes and fell into sleep. The hardest part was staying awake and focused enough to breathe when they told me to breathe a certain way. And zero nausea during injection of the contrast (no “sunburn” or an allergic reaction following either, unlike with iodine, thank god).

I did hold my breath in fear when the machine first turned on, however, but only because I was paranoid about the prospect of having missed some form of metal being left in my body. Luckily, all was good. I just hoped the results would be the same. My anxiety was gone, realizing I was nervous for nothing – as usual."

Source: Excerpts from Update Part 3: The Cardiac MRI, Undiagnosed Warrior, August 30, 2015.

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Last Updated : Monday, February 6, 2017