Black Healthcare

I implore my colleagues to not only take time to recognize the contributions of Black people in the United States, but also to acknowledge the many ways Black bodies have involuntarily contributed to medical advances we take for granted. Only then can we begin to change the health-care system and our role in perpetuating biases within it - Dr. Zia Okocha

Black Healthcare

image by: 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East
     

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Race and Medicine: The Harm That Comes From Mistrust

Racial discrimination has shaped so many American institutions that perhaps it should be no surprise that health care is among them. Put simply, people of color receive less care — and often worse care — than white Americans.

Reasons includes lower rates of health coverage; communication barriers; and racial stereotyping based on false beliefs.

Predictably, their health outcomes are worse than those of whites.

African-American patients tend to receive lower-quality health services, including for cancer, H.I.V., prenatal care and preventive care, vast research shows. They are also less likely to receive treatment for cardiovascular disease, and they are more likely to…

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Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Unlike other diseases, the mortality rate from sickle cell disease is on the rise. When you consider that the majority of these patients are African-American, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised.

Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Unlike other diseases, the mortality rate from sickle cell disease is on the rise. When you consider that the majority of these patients are African-American, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised.

Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Does Sickle Cell Disease Expose Racism in American Healthcare?

Unlike other diseases, the mortality rate from sickle cell disease is on the rise. When you consider that the majority of these patients are African-American, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised.

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Last Updated : Wednesday, February 3, 2021