Fluoridation

Fluoridation is the greatest case of scientific fraud of this century, if not of all time - Robert Carton, Ph.D. former US EPA scientist

Fluoridation

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For many of us, water fluoridation is a matter of everyday experience, and we generally take its presence in our drinking water and its value in cavity prevention for granted. The first public water fluoridation occurred in the U.S. in 1945. Today, 67 percent of American communities have public fluoridated water systems. In fact, water fluoridation has spread thruout most of the developed world and is considered one of the ten greatest public health interventions of the twentieth century.

However, some think that water fluoridation should not be a fact of life, and that it represents both a trampling of civil liberties and an unrecognized threat to health. In fact, several countries have banned fluoridation including Sweden. While it’s true that those crying foul regarding civil liberties and labeling well-accepted prevention measures as threats or conspiracies (immunizations, for example) are often not all that well informed, the fluoridation opponents have some science in their corner and they raise some interesting issues...

Proponents claim that water fluoridation is the simplest, most cost-effective way to reach the greatest number of people with a preventive solution given the continued presence and cost of tooth decay.

Opponents suggest that there are enough readily available alternatives that are safer and more controllable. For example, fluoride supplementation through rinses or chewable tablets is frequently available through schools in areas where water is not fluoridated. They further point out that money spent on water fluoridation should be redirected towards better dental care for at-risk populations, especially better federal funding for dental work.

However, proponents say that those at greatest risk, those with low income or low education, are the least likely to have access to alternative methods for fluoridation, essentially building on the basis of the opposing argument by pointing out that many dentists will not accept lower levels of reimbursement.

The availability of fluoridated dental hygiene products combined with the susceptibility of vulnerable populations makes water fluoridation an outdated and clumsy mechanism for delivering prevention. It makes better sense to intervene more directly with at-risk populations and in doing so, make progress towards the larger issue of eradicating tooth decay and eventually making tap water fluoridation unnecessary. Other countries have!

So, Is your tap water still fluoridated? Chances are if you live in the United States or Canada it is. Maybe, you should consider drinking bottled water, but it has its issues too. Better yet, maybe it's time to move!

Source: Susan Brissette, Excerpt from Water Fluoridation, Has It Outlived Its Usefulness? Heads or Tails, Healthworldnet.com, March 18, 2011.

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Last Updated : Monday, August 19, 2019