NSTEMI

The treatment of the patient with STEMI is straightforward. NSTE-ACS management is not as straightforward. The varying degrees of coronary obstruction and the overall risk profile of the patient complicates the final disposition in the emergency department, making management of NSTE-ACS patients both frustrating and exciting - Sushant Kapoor, DO

NSTEMI
NSTEMI

image by: Pierre Tupamac

HWN Recommends

Elephants on chests: Angina & NSTEMIs

Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) can be divided into three subgroups, STEMI, NSTEMI, and unstable angina. In contrast to unstable angina, positive cardiac biomarkers are found in patients with either a STEMI or NSTEMI. In unstable angina, cardiac biomarkers are negative, and it is the history that is heavily relied upon to make the diagnosis. The incidence of ACS in the US is more than 780,000/year, with the majority of them (70%) ultimately diagnosed with NSTEMI. The median age of diagnosis at presentation is 68 years, and men experience greater rates compared to women with a ratio of 3:2. A diagnosis of NSTEMI can be made when there is a rise and/or fall of cardiac troponin (cTn) above the…

read full article

Resources

 Elephants on chests: Angina & NSTEMIs

Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) can be divided into three subgroups, STEMI, NSTEMI, and unstable angina. In contrast to unstable angina, positive cardiac biomarkers are found in patients with either a STEMI or NSTEMI.

ACEP

Should adult patients with acute non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction receive immediate antiplatelet therapy in addition to aspirin to reduce 30-day major adverse cardiac events?

EB Medicine

Up to 25% of patients who present to the ED with chest pain are diagnosed with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). For the emergency clinician, it is critical to make the correct diagnosis, fast: STEMI, NSTEMI, unstable angina (or is it pulmonary embolism or just heartburn?).

StatPearls

The “typical” presentation of NSTEMI is a pressure-like substernal pain, occurring at rest or with minimal exertion. The pain generally lasts more than 10 minutes and may radiate to either arm, the neck, or the jaw. The pain may be associated with dyspnea, nausea or vomiting, syncope, fatigue, or diaphoresis. Sudden onset of unexplained dyspnea with or without associated symptoms is also a common presentation.

Introducing Stitches!

Your Path to Meaningful Connections in the World of Health and Medicine
Connect, Collaborate, and Engage!

Coming Soon - Stitches, the innovative chat app from the creators of HWN. Join meaningful conversations on health and medical topics. Share text, images, and videos seamlessly. Connect directly within HWN's topic pages and articles.


Be the first to know when Stitches starts accepting users


Stay Connected